Base

Name:
Maria Isabel Endara
If Other:
Business Name:

Ají Jimia

Location:

Ecuador

Address:
City:
State/Province
Zip Code:
Country:

Ecuador

Region:
South America
In Business Since:

2014

Phone:
Website:
Do you have experience exporting directly?

No

Describe yourself in 140 characters or less:

Ground chili powders produced by indigenous Achuar women in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Bio:

Ají Jimia supports indigenous communities and agrobiodiversity by producing delicious chili powders, made from chilis produced by Achuar indigneous women of the Ecuadorian Amazon. Chilis have long played an essential role in Amazon communities, where they are grown in chakras, small agricultural plots in the forest maintained by families and communities. The chilis are grown, dried, and ground by hand by the Achuar women, and then sent to the city to be further dried and sieved for impurities. This activity allows them to maintain ancestral practices, conserve forest by adding value to their native biodiversity, and generate income for their communities.

Number of employees:

1-10

Size of business (annual sales in US$)

<US$50,000

What is your primary language?

English

Products of interest
Sector (check all that apply)

Food and beverage

Type

Manufacturer, marketer

Type (select all that apply)

Grower or harvester

Export to

United States

Sector ( check all that apply )

Food and beverage

Type ( check all that apply )

Standards or Certification Body

Markets (Select all that apply)

Afghanistan

Type ( check all that apply )
Business - First/Last Name

Maria Isabel Endara

If other, please explain below
Do you export directly?
About Us
Ají Jimia supports indigenous communities and agrobiodiversity by producing delicious chili powders, made from chilis produced by Achuar indigneous women of the Ecuadorian Amazon. Chilis have long played an essential role in Amazon communities, where they are grown in chakras, small agricultural plots in the forest maintained by families and communities. The chilis are grown, dried, and ground by hand by the Achuar women, and then sent to the city to be further dried and sieved for impurities. This activity allows them to maintain ancestral practices, conserve forest by adding value to their native biodiversity, and generate income for their communities.